About me

My passion is directing, but my
career started after I graduated from Cosmetology school. In 1981 I started teaching at Newberry School of Beauty cosmetology in Los Angeles. I quickly moved on to working for Sebastian International salons in Tarzana and Beverly Hills as a hair colorist. While working I  opened a spa in Studio City called LEGACY in the mid 80's with a friend. We were able to grow an amazing cliental of interesting professionals in the industry which was surrounding our spa.
My family heritage is based in the film industry. My great grandfather William Guthrie ran Warner Bothers for 40 years in the Locations dept but did much more then that. He got his start as an assistant director on the film Crashin' Through in 1924. My grandfather Lester Guthrie started the Directors Guild of America and was the assistant director on 91 episodes of The Lone Ranger. My father Lynn Guthrie worked as a producer, director and unit production manager. He was the assistant director of many big films like the Graduate, They Shoot Horses Don't They and A Man Called Horse just to mention a few. We are coming up on 100 years in the Film industry in my family.  I grew up on films as a child and knew I would be a part of telling stories like my family before me. Obsessed with period film making I was honored to land a job doing wigs and hair on ELVIS AND ME. Such a fun show. A film I will never forget working on is DANCES WITH WOLVES . Tons of wigs and extensions.  JFK was a chance to be very creative and then another Oliver Stone period film HEAVEN AND EARTH. I worked on many shows but these are the ones that I love the most because they were period pieces.  During this time of being on set on these films I was given the opportunity to watch the director do his job.
If only I could direct a movie I thought and dreamed.  At least being on set I was able to see the magic happen and know that waiting for the light was important as well as getting the emotion from the talent.These elements in telling the story were the key to the success of the film.  Even as a 5 years old on the set of The Beverly Hillbillies I studied the magic. It's all I know.
 My passion
shifted and life became all about photography. I had learned photography from my father and my mentor a man names James Globus. James was a famous on set photographer. At least with the camera in my hand I would get closer to my dreams of story telling.  I went to college to learn fine art photography. After my first year of college I was awarded PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR in a school wide fine arts gallery competition. I had the best teacher. BILL HENDRICKS  . My photo was stolen from the exhibit and my teacher said that was a good thing. That means they like it, he said no one would steal his work. His work is amazing though.
A few years later. My husband J. Michael Muro was making his mark in the film industry and after he worked on Titanic he asked me to edit a reel for him. It didn't take me long to know that if a photo was worth a thousand words a video was worth a thousand dollars. I bought one of the first affordable non linear editing suites called the VIDEO TOASTER. I think the hard drive was 6 gigs for 9K and I bought 4 of them. I opened a small video production co. on my own and made corporate videos.
My passion was elevated as I was able to use the camera and tell the story. So I decided I wanted to give back and teach young adults to shoot and edit. I taught media arts and performing art classes in a sweet small private high school for 4 years called CORNERSTONE. I taught the students how to shoot videos and edit their footage and tell stories. This was very rewarding. My husband was working on TITANIC at the time and the students and I would load up in the big SUV and cross the board of Mexico to get close to the magic of this incredible movie making experience. We were there standing on the ground looking up at Kate and Leo on the bow of the ship with their arms stretched out together. As the sun was setting beautifully, at that moment I knew in my heart this movie was going to be BIG!  My students will never forget that moment as long as they live and neither will I.
During the time I taught media arts I directed 3 big soldout productions  at the THOUSAND OAKS CIVIC ARTS PLAZA  including Seven Brides for Seven Brothers extending the cast to the community. We had talented cast spanning ages, a child as young as 3 years old to a gentleman that was 70.
I was able to get the original broadway sets of Seven Brides and Al Kasha the writer attended. Another theatre production I directed was my favorite. A modern day multimedia version of ROMEO AND JULIET.   I shot and edited the footage myself for the video portion and the talent would act on stage below the large screen that projected the footage I shot. Sold out all three nights.
The still digital camera came out and I bought a Canon. My husband was making his debut as a cinematographer and he needed someone to do the  Digital Intermediate on OPEN RANGE. I would take the photos with the digital camera or work with the ones my husband took and I would change the color timing and in some cases manipulate them in the way he saw fit for the film. PANIC ROOM was the only film at that time to do a Digital Intermediate. So I would be able to work on the second film doing a DI.
I made a friend on OPEN RANGE  named Christine who was at the time dating our director Kevin (they are now married.) After the film was over they invited me to partner in a business making beautiful vintage style computer bags and handbags.  I didn't know anything about doing manufacturing but Kevin insured me I could do it. Here is some press from that time. DENVER POST Manufacturing was exciting and challenging. Our bags were in Bloomingdales, Century City and we had our own signage up on the wall which was pretty exciting. CAT BAG COUTURE. Cat stands for Christine And Tamara.
The third
wave of coffee inspired me. I spent 5 years researching how coffee was grown and where, the science of roasting, the perfection of pulling a shot and of course the latte art. I traveled all across the country and Canada learning from the experts. I made videos of all the top baristas I could find and put them on a site called latteartthrowdown.com. It didn't take long for the coffee industry to know who I was. An article was written about me in the top coffee social media site call Sprudge.com After that I joined the Barista Guild of America and Specialty Coffee Association of America.  I trained with the top Barista's and passed my level one written and practical exam to become a certified barista with the BGA.
Then I opened a adorable espresso bar and cafe called Velvet Espresso Bar in New Orleans. I continued my studies with the BGA and passed my level 2 exam to become #30 in the world to pass the level two exam.
I competed in many national competitions and here is one that was written about on Sprudge.com  I then opened another cafe in New Orleans and then a coffee cart and a food truck.
These small cafes offered handmade, small batch, slow food style, baked goods I made myself with my team and family.
 I am currently working on shadowing directors and directing for network and cable